The Art of Exploration · a diary of day trips, natural places, and miscellaneous adventures

Two Storms

Friday, June 18th, 2010 in Illinois
Two Storms

I’ve heard that in the moments before a tsunami crashes ashore, the sea rushes away from the beach. I’ve also heard that what you don’t want to do at such a time is follow the sea as it rushes out, because it’s coming back with it a bloody big wave. A wave that will lay ruin to all in its path.

The first of two thunderstorms that barreled through my town today was like an airborne tsunami. As the front edge of the thunderstorm hit, it took in a great gulp, a deep inhillation. Air skimmed the ground moving westward for half a minute, in the direction of the storm. The air was moving the wrong direction, like the receeding waters that preface a tsunami.

The wave of inhaled air came back, of course. It brought with it the frothy front edge of a furious storm. A wall of wind plowed through my yard, sending leaves, twigs and bits of bark in circles overhead. There was an electric buzz in the air, an undeniable strength. It was the pure the power of nature.

When the rain came it fell in sheets. Then there was more wind: tree bending, branch breaking, trunk splitting wind. The little northern catalpa in my backyard swayed and bent like a flimsy mop. See for yourself:

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Assortment

The Gathering Storm
The Gathering Storm
Today I went for a quick lap around the Eagle Wind Trail at Rabbit Mountain. At the beginning of my hike, I noticed the storm clouds building over Boulder but thought little of it.
London Eye
London Eye 1
It’s been a lovely trip to London and our visit is almost over. One last thing we want to do before heading home is to take a spin on the London Eye. To avoid the daytime crowds, we schedule our ride for half-past eight Sunday evening.
Our Avocados
Our Avocados
As you can see, we made it to Hawaii. But not until we suffered a few days of total exhaustion in Seattle. We slept so much we barely made it out of the hotel. I suppose that’s what we get after working relentlessly for too many hours.